athens archaeological site

Below, you have the Athens archaeological sites which you should make the time to visit on your Greece vacation. For each Athens archaeological site, you have:

  • an image and the name of the Athens archaeological site;
  • a short description of the archaeological site;
  • visiting information including opening times, ticket prices, address and map location, telephone if available, and details on how to get there using public transport.

Athens archaeological sites

  1. Acropolis of Athens
  2. Ancient Agora
  3. Areopagus Hill
  4. Kerameikos
  5. Roman Forum
  6. Temple of Olympian Zeus

Acropolis archaeological site in Athens

Acropolis of Athens

The citadel and the sanctuary of the city in antiquity, the Acropolis is the holy rock of Athens where you can visit the iconic Parthenon.

The marble works of art were raised at the end of the 5th century BC, during the Golden Age of Athens (the rule of Pericles). Most of the temples on the Acropolis were built in honor of Athena, the patron of the city of Athens. Their sheer size makes them impressive, but they are also worthy of admiration for their beautiful statues of the gods.


What to visit on the Acropolis of Athens

  • Propylaea. On top of the rock of the Acropolis, there is the Propylaea, the main entrance through which all visitors pass. Careful not to touch the marble, or someone will scold you for it!
  • Temple of Athena Nike. Ever since ancient times, there was a temple dedicated here to the goddess of Athena Nike (Athena the Victorious). It always protected the most vulnerable side of the Acropolis of Athens from enemy attacks.
  • The Panathenaic Way. This is the road on which an ancient procession of honoring the goddess Athena used to take place. During this, the goddess would receive a new coat (peplos), together with various sacrifices.
  • The Parthenon. The icon of Classical Ancient Greece, the Parthenon is an impressive temple dedicated to the goddess Athena. She is represented inside through a large ivory and gold statue.
  • The Erechteion. Legend has it that this is where Athena and Poseidon fought for the patronage over the city of Athens. The Erechteion unites two separate temples, dedicated to the two gods.
  • Odeon of Herodes Atticus. Built in the year 161, the Odeon of Herodes Atticus is a later addition to the Acropolis of Athens. During summer, it hosts the Festival of Athens.
  • Theater of Dionysos. Considered the birthplace of Greek tragedy, the Theater of Dionysos was once decorated with mosaics and used to accommodate as much as 15,000 guests. In the front rows, you can still see the engraved marble seats of the priests of Dionysos.

Visit the Acropolis of Athens either in the morning or in the evening, to avoid the heat during the day and a large number of visitors.

Make sure to take a bottle of water with you, as the prices practiced by the establishments on the Acropolis are very high. You can also refill the bottle on your way up the Acropolis of Athens.


Tickets, opening times, and other useful information


Opening Times

The Acropolis of Athens is open 7 days per week. During Winter, it is open from 08.00 to 16.00. During Summer, it is open between 08.00 and 19.00.


Tickets 

A full general admission ticket costs € 20.00 and it covers the access to the Acropolis and the Theater of Dionysus. 

Reduced tickets cost € 10.00 and they are provided for students from non-EU countries and senior citizens over 65 years from EU countries. 

Free access is provided to children and teenagers under the age of 18 years, students from EU countries, visitors with disabilities, journalists. Proper identification needs to be provided for getting a reduced ticket or free admission.

Days with free admission: 6 March, 18 April, 18 May, last weekend of September, 28 October, every first Sunday between 1 November and 31 March.

Save money with the combined ticket of € 30.00 (reduced € 15.00)! It covers the access to the Ancient AgoraKerameikos, the Roman Forum, and the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is also valid for a week.

Acropolis of Athens
Address: Athens 105 58, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Subway line 2 (Red line) from Ahthoupoli to Elliniko reaches the Akropoli station
Tel. +30 2103 214 172 / +30 2103 236 665


Ancient Agora archaeological site in Athens

Ancient Agora of Athens

Founded in the 6th century BC, this archaeological site was once the commercial, political, financial, and religious center of Ancient Athens for over 1000 years. This is the place where Socrates used to address the people, and where St. Paul held his sermons.


What to visit in the Ancient Agora of Athens

  • Basileus Porticle. Raised in the year 500 BC, it once housed the judicial chancellery of the ancient cults. Most of the building was destroyed, though, during the invasions of the Goths (year 267).
  • Odeon of Agrippa. This amphitheater was built in the year 15, by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. Its exterior was once decorated with Giants and other mythical creatures.
  • Temple of Hephaestus (Thission). It is one of the best-preserved temples of Ancient Greece. The Temple is actually dedicated to two gods: Hephaestus, protector of metallurgists, and Athena Ergani, protector of potters.
  • Tholos. This circular building once housed the 50 members of the executive committee in the first parliament. Tholos is translated as a beehive.
  • Monument of the Eponymous Heroes. The inhabitants were once split among 10 tribes, each represented by a hero of the Attica region. The Monument of the Eponymous Heroes was decorated with the bronze states of the heroes representing one of the tribes.
  • Altar of Zeus Agoraios. This temple dedicated to the ruler of the gods was initially raised in a different place of Athens, in the 4th century BC. However, in the 1st century, it was dismembered, brought to Agora and put back together like a puzzle.
  • The Middle Stoa. With its two hallways decorated by columns, this building occupies most of the center of the Ancient Agora.
  • The Nymphaion. Today only ruins, the Nymphaion was once a fountain raised in the 2nd century. Its remains are still visible despite the fact that a church was built on top in the 11th century.
  • The Stoa of Attalos. King Attalos II of Pergamon ordered the raising of this impressive two-level building. It was reconstructed by the American School of Archeology in 1956, and today it is a museum hosting the archaeological discoveries made in the Ancient Agora.

The best place to see the Basileus Porticle is Adrianou Street. Another reason to take a stroll on Adrianou Street is to try traditional Greek food and drinks at one of its many taverns.


Tickets, opening times, and other useful information


Opening times 

The Ancient Agora of Athens is open 7 days per week. During Winter, it is open between 08.00 and 15.00. During Summer, it is open between 08.00 and 18.30.


Tickets

A full general admission ticket costs € 8.00. 

Reduced tickets cost € 4.00 and are offered to students from non-EU countries and senior citizens over 65 years from EU countries. 

Free access is provided to children and teenagers under the age of 18 years, students from EU countries, visitors with disabilities, journalists. Proper identification needs to be provided for getting a reduced ticket or free admission.

Days with free admission: 6 March, 18 April, 18 May, last weekend of September, 28 October, every first Sunday between 1 November and 31 March. 

Save money with the combined ticket of € 30.00 (reduced € 15.00)! It covers the access to the Acropolis of AthensKerameikos, the Roman Forum, and the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is also valid for a week.

Ancient Agora of Athens
Address: Adrianou 24, Athina 105 55, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Subway line 1 (green line) from Piraeus to Kifissia reaches the Thissio and Monastiraki stations.
Tel. +30 2103 210 185


Areopagus Hill archaeological site in Athens

Areopagus Hill (Mars Hill)

Areopagus Hill, also known as Mars Hill, is where the court of ancient Athens was located. It offers the best view of the Agora of Athens.

On this cliff, you can see people praying or singing hymns. Pilgrims from all over the world follow the steps of St. Paul to this place. The Bible claims Areopagus is where St. Paul delivered his famous sermon on the injustices of ancient Greek religions to the people of Athens. Thus, this is where the first Athenians were converted to Christianity.


Opening times and other useful information


Opening times

Areopagus Hill is accessible at any hour.


Tickets

Entrance is free of charge.

Areopagus Hill (Mars Hill)
Address: Theorias 21, Athina 105 55, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Within walking distance of the Monastiraki station. It can be reached via subway line 1 (Green line) connecting Piraeus to Kifissia. Another option is the subway line 3 (Blue line) connecting Aghia Marina to the Airport.


Kerameikos archaeological site in Athens

Kerameikos

Once a classic cemetery in Ancient Athens, it is now an open-air gallery. A visit to Kerameikos (or Keramikos) offers an interesting perspective over life and death, with its tombs decorated with impressive sculptures. The Kerameikos helps you get an insight into the activities which took place in the outskirts of Athens. Here, you can also see temples, sacred roads, pottery workshops, but also an ancient brothel.

Furthermore, the Kerameikos is a shaded oasis where you can hide from the heat and crowds of busy Athens.


What to visit in the Kerameikos

  • The city walls. The walls of the city of Athens were raised in a hurry by Temistocle, ruler of Athens, in the year 478 BC. That is why they contain all sorts of materials, including marble taken from temples or funerary monuments.
  • Dipylon. The main roads connecting Athens to Thebes, Corinth, and Peloponnese lead to this main gate on the city walls.
  • The Sacred Gate. The Sacred Way used to pass through this gate. It was reserved for pilgrims and priestesses traveling each year to Eleusis.
  • Pompeion. This was a place used for the preparations for the religious processions and festivities. An example is the bringing of a new peplos each year to the statue of Athena, located inside the Parthenon.
  • Kerameikos Archaeological Museum. The small museum full of archaeological discoveries also has ceramic fragments illustrating brothel scenes.
  • The marble bull. You can find this on the tomb of Dionysos of Kollytos. The inscriptions on the tomb say that he was worshiped as a god, and died a bachelor, mourned by his mother and sisters.
  • Grave stele of Hegeso. This beautiful stele depicts Hegeso admiring a small jewel, next to a servant. The original, from the 5th century BC, can be admired in the National Museum of Archaeology.
  • The Tritopatreion Sanctuary. In this space, Athenians gathered to worship their common ancestors. It is located where the Sacred Way crosses the Tombs Way.

The Kerameikos is wonderful to watch under the light of the setting sun.


Tickets, opening times, and other useful information


Opening times

The Keramikos is open 7 days per week. During Winter, it is open from 08.00 to 15.00. During Summer, it is open between 08.00 and 18.30.

Tickets

A full general admission ticket costs € 8.00. 

Reduced tickets cost € 4.00 and are offered to senior citizens over 65 years from EU countries. 

Free access is provided to children and teenagers under the age of 18 years, students from EU countries, visitors with disabilities, journalists. Proper identification needs to be provided for getting a reduced ticket or free admission. 

Days with free admission: 6 March, 18 April, 18 May, last weekend of September, 28 October, every first Sunday between 1 November and 31 March.

Save money with the combined ticket of € 30.00 (reduced € 15.00)! It covers the access to the Acropolis of Athens, the Ancient Agora, the Roman Forum and the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is also valid for a week.

Kerameikos
Address: Ermou 148, Athina 105 53, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Close to the Kerameikos subway station on line 3 (Blue line), connecting Aghia Marina to the Airport.
Tel. +30 2103 463 552


Roman Agora archaeological site in Athens

Roman Forum (Roman Agora)

Located between Plaka and Monastiraki, the Roman Forum was built during the first century. It was raised as an extension of the Ancient Agora. Its most important attraction is the Tower of the Winds, which also houses an interesting water clock.


What to visit in the Roman Forum

  • The Tower of the Winds. The octagonal tower was built by the astronomer Andronikos Kyrrhestas in the year 50 BC. Considered the first meteorological station in the world, it also has a water clock inside.
  • Byzantine funerary decorations. The Tower of the Winds was used once as a church, and it was surrounded by a cemetery, with beautiful tombs. Later on, all these tombs, together with others from the city of Athens, were gathered to this spot.
  • The Gate of Athena Archegetis. This is the second most important monument of this archaeological site, after the Tower of The Winds. Raised in the year 11 BC, the Gate is dedicated to goddess Athena. You can still see the inscription claiming that Julius Caesar and Augustus were the ones who raised the Gate.
  • Hadrian’s Library. This majestic building with Corinthian columns was raised by emperor Hadrian in the year 132. Besides the reading halls, the library boasted music halls, a theater, interior gardens, and a pool.
  • Fethiye Djami. Even under the Ottomans, the Roman Agora remained an important center of the city of Athens. In 1456, the Turks raised this mosque on the ruins of an early Christian church.
  • The East Propylon. One of the two original entrances into the Roman Agora. Near the entrance here, you can find sculptures illustrating important Roman citizens.
  • Agoranomeion. This building used to be the office of the administrators of the Agora.
  • The yard. The center of all activities in the Roman Agora, the yard was once surrounded by various shops. During Hadrian’s time (2nd century), the courtyard was paved.
  • Vespasianae. This rectangular building with an interior courtyard used to be the public toilet. It had 68 toilets, placed along the walls of the building. Believe it or not, this used to be a meeting place!

At the end of August, on the night of the harvest moon, there is a classical music concert held inside the Roman Agora.


Tickets, opening times, and other useful information


Opening Times

 The Roman Forum is open 7 days per week, between 08.00 and 17.00.


Tickets

 A full general admission ticket costs € 6.00. 

Reduced tickets cost € 3.00 and are offered to students from non-EU countries and senior citizens over 65 years from EU countries. 

Free access is provided to children and teenagers under the age of 18 years, students from EU countries, visitors with disabilities, journalists. Proper identification needs to be provided for getting a reduced ticket or free admission.

Days with free admission: 6 March, 18 April, 18 May, last weekend of September, 28 October, every first Sunday between 1 November and 31 March. 

Save money with the combined ticket of € 30.00 (reduced € 15.00)! It covers access to the Acropolis of Athens, the Ancient AgoraKerameikos, and the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is also valid for a week.

Roman Forum (Roman Agora)
Address: Polignotou 3, Athina 105 55, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Within walking distance of the Monastiraki subway station. It can be reached via subway line 1 (Green line) connecting Piraeus to Kifissia. Another option is the subway line 3 (Blue line) connecting Aghia Marina to the Airport.
Tel. +30 2103 463 552


Temple of Olympian Zeus archaeological site in Athens

Temple of Olympian Zeus and its surroundings

Dedicated to the father of the Greek gods, the Temple of Olympian Zeus was the largest temple of Antiquity. Its construction started in 515 BC, and it was finalized almost 700 years later. Today, only 16 columns still stand out of the initial 104.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is located next to the monumental Hadrian’s Arch, which once split Athens between the Greek hero Theseus and the Roman emperor Adrian.

In its surrounding area, there are also Greek temples, Roman baths, and a ruined law court.


What to visit near the temple of Olympian Zeus

  • Hadrian’s Arch. This Arch was raised at the order of Roman emperor Hadrian. On one side it bears the writing “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus”, while on the other it has “This is Hadrian’s city, not Theseus’s”. This way, Hadrian drew a clear line between the mythical city to the real one he ruled.
  • The Roman Baths. Among the ruins of Hadrianopolis, you can find the best-preserved Roman baths in all of Athens. Originally, the floors were covered with beautiful mosaics.
  • Valerian Wall. Roman emperor Valerian ordered the construction of this wall in the 3rd century. Several temples from the area were demolished to obtain the marble necessary for raising this wall.
  • Temple of Apollo Delphinios and Artemis Delphinia. This Greek temple was raised for the gods Apollo and Artemis represented as dolphins.
  • Delphinion Law Court. This building from the 5th century BC is all ruins now. It is thought to be the place where the palace of mythical king Aegeus, father of Theseus, once stood.
  • Temple of Cronus and Rhea. This 5th century BC Greek temple was dedicated to the parents of Zeus. Today, only the foundation still stands.

Aim to visit the Temple between 15.00 and 16.00. That way, you’ll get the best light to snap the perfect photo!


Tickets, opening times, and other useful information

Opening Times

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is open 7 days per week. During Winter, it is open from 08.00 to 16.30. During Summer, it is open between 08.00 and 19.30.

Tickets

 A full general admission ticket costs € 6.00. Reduced tickets cost € 3.00.

Save money with the combined ticket of € 30.00 (reduced € 15.00)! It covers access to the Acropolis of Athens, the Ancient AgoraKerameikos, and the Roman Forum. It is also valid for a week.

Temple of Olympian Zeus
Address: Athens 105 57, Greece | See on map
Public transport: Subway line 2 (red line) from Ahthoupoli to Elliniko reaches the nearby Akropoli station.
Tel. +30 2109 226 330


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